Thinkers 50 http://thinkers50.com Scanning, ranking and sharing the best management ideas in the world Mon, 26 Jun 2017 14:00:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Light Bulb Man http://thinkers50.com/blog/light-bulb-man/ Mon, 26 Jun 2017 14:00:47 +0000 http://thinkers50.com/?p=9878 “Genius is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent perspiration,” Thomas Edison famously observed. This remains one of the most quoted—and […]

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“Genius is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent perspiration,” Thomas Edison famously observed. This remains one of the most quoted—and insightful—observations ever made on the subject. It is testimony to his special place in the pantheon of innovation, too, that the light bulb that he invented has become synonymous with new ideas and innovation.

Lesson 1: Innovation begets innovation

To understand innovation, Edison’s own life is instructive. His observation about the effort required to turn ideas into innovations was also the maxim by which he lived. By the end of his extraordinary career, Edison had accumulated 1,093 U.S. and 1,300 foreign patents. The inventor of the phonograph and the incandescent light bulb also found time to start up or control 13 major companies. His endeavors directly or indirectly led to the creation of several well-known corporations, including General Electric and RCA. Consolidated Edison is still listed on the New York Stock Exchange.

Edison proved that ideas breed – if you let them.  The most innovative people are restlessly and continually creative as they know that ideas feed off each other.

Lesson 2: Innovation needs support

In New York Edison formed his first partnership with Frank L. Pope, a noted telegraphic engineer, to exploit their inventions. The partnership was subsequently absorbed by Gold & Stock, a company controlled by Marshall Lefferts, former president of the American Telegraph Company, who paid $20,000 to the two partners for the privilege. Recognizing Edison’s ingenuity, Lefferts conducted a side deal with him, securing Edison’s independent patents for the then princely sum of $30,000.

Investing in genius can give it the space to grow and succeed.

Lesson 3: Bold aims pay off

The 1870s were the most creative period of Edison’s life. Needing to expand his operation, he moved into buildings in Menlo Park, a town 24 miles from New York on the New York and Philadelphia Railroad. The name Menlo Park has become synonymous with innovation. It was there that Edison and his team perfected the phonograph. The patents were filed in December 1877, but Edison barely paused to draw breath. He began to experiment with incandescent filaments and glass bulbs. While he was still some way off from developing what would become the light bulb, Edison managed to persuade a consortium that he could produce a commercially viable lighting system based on such a product. As a result, he signed a rights and remuneration agreement that laid the foundation for the Edison Electric Light Company.

In reality, Edison was far from developing such a product. Time passed, with Edison continuing to make favorable noises about progress, although he was actually making little headway in the lab. Feeling the pressure, at one point he retired to an under-stairs cupboard, took a dose of morphine, and slept for 36 hours.

It was on Wednesday, November 12, 1879, that Edison finally produced a bulb that remained lighted long enough to be considered of commercial value. It lasted for 40 hours and 20 minutes, and within two months, he had extended its longevity to 600 hours. Visitors trekked to Menlo Park to gaze in wonder at the lights that lit the roadway. Sadly, what followed for Edison was not the triumph of his invention but a period of protracted patent litigation that lasted more than 10 years.

Even so, the lesson is clear: aim high. Time and time again we have encountered entrepreneurs who repeatedly told clients they could do something when they have never tried it before.  They have the confidence that they can do it even without a proven track record.  They get the work because they have the chutzpah as much as for any business brilliance. Boldness pays.

Lesson 4: Innovate then commercialize

A great idea leads to a genuine innovation only if it can be commercialized. Undoubtedly, a large part of Edison’s genius lay in his realization that innovation alone was insufficient for commercial success. Edison focused on creating commercially viable products. To do so, he assembled a team of brilliant minds at Menlo Park. In effect, he created the first product research lab—a forerunner of facilities such as the celebrated Xerox PARC at Palo Alto, California. It was a practical and commercial approach to invention that proved to be immensely successful.

While it seems obvious that innovation without commercialization is a rather empty experience, it is worth noting that there are many, many innovations that fail to be commercialized or that are commercialized, but not by their creator. In their book Fast Second, Costas Markides and Paul Geroski developed this theme, pointing out that the originators of innovations as diverse as the jet engine, the typewriter, the pneumatic tire, and the magnetic tape recorder were not the people who eventually led these creations to mass commercialization. “The individuals or companies that create radically new markets are not necessarily the ones that scale them up into big mass markets,” observed Markides and Geroski. “Indeed, the evidence shows that in the majority of cases, the early pioneers of radically new markets are almost never the ones that scale up and conquer those markets.”

Being innovative also includes the ability to take an idea and to bring it out into the world to make money from it.

Lesson 5: Innovation is a team game

Innovation the Edison way provided the blueprint for the twentieth-century corporation. Innovation was neatly corralled under the umbrella of R&D. Groups of R&D technicians and scientists—geeks, we would call them today—worked on innovation and then passed the fruits of their labors on to the rest of the organization.

Tim Brown of the design company IDEO offers this take on Edison’s contribution to our approach to innovation: “Edison wasn’t a narrowly specialized scientist but a broad generalist with a shrewd business sense. In his Menlo Park, New Jersey, laboratory he surrounded himself with gifted tinkerers, improvisers, and experimenters. Indeed, he broke the mold of the ‘lone genius inventor’ by creating a team-based approach to innovation.”

Armed with the bright ideas that came out of the R&D lab, the company’s job was then to commercialize the innovations on as large a scale as possible. At the time, this worked. Once a company had created an innovative product or service, it could build a large-scale operation to commercialize it. And it could build on a large scale, knowing that its advantage would last. For a large part of the twentieth century, a company that had a superior product or service could expect its advantage to last for years, even decades. Indeed, the primary purpose and rationale for large companies was to capitalize on their competitive advantage by leveraging economies of scale to drive costs down, and to defend their competitive advantage so that they could maintain a high price premium. The success of these large organizations was predicated not on their ability to innovate, but on their ability to earn higher profits through the efficiencies that flowed from economies of scale.

Mass production democratized many of the innovations that were being introduced, but it also had one unfortunate side effect: it made innovation more difficult. With scale came efficiency, but it also made it harder for companies to experiment and innovate.  Today, these shackles have been removed. Turn on the lights!

Resources

Thomas Martin and Frank Lewis Dyer, Edison, His Life and Inventions, Andesite Press, 2015

This was originally published in What we mean when we talk about innovation by Stuart Crainer and Des Dearlove (Infinite Ideas, 2016).

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Introvert Networking: Lessons from Silicon Valley http://thinkers50.com/blog/introvert-networking-lessons-silicon-valley/ Fri, 23 Jun 2017 14:00:24 +0000 http://thinkers50.com/?p=10163 In the Silicon Valley, many senior leaders are introverted—in fact, many more than in most other industries we’ve studied in […]

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In the Silicon Valley, many senior leaders are introverted—in fact, many more than in most other industries we’ve studied in our research of over 200 C-Suite Executives. There are some great lessons that we can learn about introverts from the Valley.

Rajeev Behera has worked in the Silicon Valley for the past seven years, running marketing teams in various start-ups. He now heads up Reflektive, a communication platform that enables employees to send and receive continual, real-time feedback. He provided me with three key tips for introverts to shine bright next to their louder, extroverted peers.

Focus on manager one-on-ones

One of the most important goals introverted employees need to keep in mind is to be intentional about having one-on-ones with their managers. Extroverts, as natural talkers, are comfortable discussing what they’re working on, what their goals are, and what progress they’ve made. Because they speak so freely, openly, and with such ease, peers and managers often hear of their progress and productivity at work. Extroverts’ more expressive nature can make silent introverts appear less productive.

What Behera suggests, then, is to play to one of the strengths of introverts—that of having deeper, more detailed conversations. People with quieter presences should intentionally converse daily with their managers, even for five minutes, to update them. Because introverts are not always talking, it’s important for them to set aside time to consciously inform and update their supervisors on their progress. This not only enables introverts to properly share their insights but also forms strong relationships. For introverts, it’s often easier to speak up one-on-one than in front of peers, so this tactic also gives them the opportunity to gain visibility in the eyes of their managers.

Behera put it well: “That’s probably the biggest key: letting them know how insightful you are and being very clear about what you’re doing in those one-on-ones, and making sure you develop that one-on-one relationship with your manager—outside of group meetings and team meetings.”

Focus on quality, not quantity

The next point Behera makes is similar to a point often made in the discussion about introverts and networking. Networking can be perceived as daunting and uncomfortable for many introverts. Rather than work a room the same way an extrovert would (speaking to many people for little time), introverts often speak to fewer people but have longer, more detailed conversations. Those conversations easily go beyond the superficial and can lead to relationships that last several years after the event, long beyond the more typical duration of a mere follow-up e-mail.

Within a company, the same tactic can be used to foster deeper relationships among employees. Once you reach a certain level at an organization, you have a tight-knit set of peers and co-workers; still, it’s often beneficial to maintain relationships with employees within various sectors of an organization.

The same way introverts would speak to fewer people at a networking event but sustain a deeper conversation, they could establish good relationships with employees across the company. This enables introverts to be known—not superficially by everyone at the company, but in-depth by quite a few.

Focus on synthesis

A final point is that it’s always helpful to be a second ear to your boss. Behera noticed the manifestation of this stemming from the one-on-one relationships he had with some of his employees. These employees would go off to their meetings or work in peer groups, listen intently to conversations, synthesize the information they’d heard, and report back to him in a thoughtful manner.

The ability to synthesize a lot of information is a key skill of introverts. Instead of talking a lot in meetings, they listen closely and share important takeaways from the meetings with their managers later on. The level of insight this skill provides is a great quality of introverts—one they should capitalize on.

Though introverts are quiet, they can shine just as brightly as their extroverted peers. Establishing one-on-one conversations with a manager, fostering deeper relationships with fewer employees across the company, and synthesizing information are all gateways for introverts to spotlight their talents and productive efforts.

Introverts deserve to be heard, and being quiet should not get in the way of that.  

Karl Moore, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor, Desautels Faculty of Management; Associate Professor, Dept. of Neurology & Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University; and an Associate Fellow, Green Templeton College, Oxford University. He is doing a major research project on quiet leaders: Introverts in the Executive Suite. He is also an Associate of the Quiet Leadership Institute. Karl’s co-writer, Aya Schechner, is a recent McGill BCom grad who is working with Karl as a producer on his radio show, the CEO Series, until she begins law school in fall 2017.

This article was originally published on QuietRev.

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Thinkers50 Podcast: Jonas Ridderstråle http://thinkers50.com/blog/thinkers50-podcast-jonas-ridderstrale/ Thu, 22 Jun 2017 14:23:28 +0000 http://thinkers50.com/?p=10274 Jonas Ridderstråle is the coauthor of Funky Business, Karaoke Capitalism, and most recently, Fast Forward. Stuart Crainer talks with him […]

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Jonas Ridderstråle is the coauthor of Funky Business, Karaoke Capitalism, and most recently, Fast Forward. Stuart Crainer talks with him at the European Business Forum on what is happening in today’s business management world.

In this podcast:

  • Limited progress when business is run by men and for men. How women are becoming the next group of talent.
  • Bureaucracy to meritocracy, and the emergence of adhocracy. Adhocracy rewards action over knowledge and position.
  • Decisive action: going into unknown waters.
  • Adrenaline in business.
  • Implications for corporate governance.

Listen on iTunes All Thinkers50 Podcasts

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Strategic Confusion http://thinkers50.com/blog/strategic-confusion/ Wed, 21 Jun 2017 14:00:50 +0000 http://thinkers50.com/?p=9791 One of the most straight talking thinkers about strategy is the American academic Richard Rumelt. According to Rumelt, badly construed […]

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One of the most straight talking thinkers about strategy is the American academic Richard Rumelt. According to Rumelt, badly construed strategy has four hallmarks which should set alarm bells ringing. These are:

  • Failure to face the problem: usually when the problem has not been properly defined.
  • Mistaking goals for strategy: this was the mistake made by Lehman Brothers.
  • Bad strategic objectives: beware a long list of objectives, which are not prioritized or even connected to each other.
  • The final hallmark is what Rumelt calls “fluff” – or hubris. Distrust a strategy that restates the obvious with buzzwords. Rumelt gives the example of a retail bank, which proclaimed: “Our fundamental strategy is one of customer-centric intermediation.” In reality, intermediation is banking. Customer-centric was meaningless. So once the buzzwords were removed the bank’s strategy boiled down to being a bank – tautological at best.

As Richard Rumelt has lamented, bad strategies are commonplace.  And, in an era of constant and unpredictable change, the practical usefulness of strategy is increasingly — and loudly — questioned.  The skeptics argue that it is all well and good to come up with a brilliantly formulated strategy, but quite another to implement it.  By the time implementation begins, the business environment is liable to have changed and be in the process of changing even further.

During the early 1990s, the death knell for traditional approaches to strategy was sounded.  “The humane thing to do with most strategic planning processes is to kill them off,” concluded a report by OC&C Strategy Consultants.

“As ‘strategy’ has blossomed, the competitiveness of Western companies has withered. This may be coincidence, but we think not,” noted CK Prahalad and Gary Hamel.

Research by the American Planning Forum found that a mere 25 percent of companies considered their planning processes to be effective.  Similarly, in his book The Rise and Fall of Strategic Planning, Henry Mintzberg took on the full might of conventional planning orthodoxy.  “Too much analysis gets in our way.  The failure of strategic planning is the failure of formalization,” said Mintzberg, identifying formalization as the fatal flaw of modern management.

Mintzberg argued the case for, what he labeled, strategic programing.  His view was that strategy has for too long been housed in ivory towers built from corporate data and analysis.  It had become distant from reality, when to have any viable commercial life strategy needs to become completely immersed in reality.  “Strategies appear at predetermined times, popping out when expected, full blown, all ready for implementation.  It is almost as if they are immaculately conceived,” he caustically observed.

After a decent period of mourning, strategic planning began undergoing something of a re-birth. First, rather than being regarded as an annual ritual, strategy is now more commonly seen as a continuous process, a dialogue rather than a monologue.  Second, the focus is on the big picture rather than on operational plans. Instead of weighty planning departments filled with bright minds producing great plans never to see the light of day, the emphasis is on strategy as part of corporate development with small teams working on distinct projects calling on outside consultants when necessary.  The role of the consultants principally lies in benchmarking corporate performance, monitoring and identifying external trends and helping develop a corporate vision.

All this confirms that, amid its constant rise and falls, strategy remains deeply bedded in confusion.  Rarely has so much theorizing amounted to so little effective practice.  The confusion over such a well-debated issue can be attributed to a number of factors:

Confusion over what strategy actually is.  There is a confusion between what an organization is actually doing, what it says it is doing and what it should be doing.  In practice, strategy tends to embrace all three.

The sheer profusion of approaches. In the faddish world of management thinking no single subject has generated so many bright ideas — from strategic intent to core competencies, blue oceans to balanced scorecards.

Confusion with the actual processes of developing and then implementing strategy.  The process remains clouded by verbiage.  Does an organization study its marketplace and competitive environment and then change itself to meet perceived opportunities?  Indeed, Harvard’s Michael Porter defines strategy as the positioning of the company relative to its industry environment.  Or, does strategy begin with the organization, examining what it excels at and then aim to make the most of those assets in the current environment?

The shift from linear thinking to emergent chaos.  In the current business environment where the calls for change and transformation are constant, the traditional methods of formulating and implementing strategy are increasingly questioned.  The conventional approach takes as its guiding light the acronym MOST (Mission, Objectives, Strategy and Tactics).  This offers an orderly progression from creating a mission to making the strategy happen.

Life is no longer so simple.  “In practice, the real process of strategy development and direction setting is much more messy, experimental, uncertain, iterative and driven from the bottom upwards,” says Andrew Campbell of the Ashridge Strategic Management Centre.  “There are five reasons for rejecting the MOST framework.  First, the competitive economic system in which companies act provides constraints that are often interpreted as objectives.  Second, strategy and objectives are intertwined, not linear.  Third, it is useless to develop a separation between strategy, tactics and operations – insights about creating value come as often from operating details as from broad strategic concepts. Fourth, academics and consultants differ in their views about how insights can best be developed and captured.  Fifth, there are also differences in view about how best to implement strategy in an uncertain world.”

The battle between analysis and intuition.  From this it would seem that the days of highly analytical, rational, strategy creation are past.  But, strategy can neither be purely rational nor purely intuitive.  Indeed, one of the core skills of managers is to know when and how to use their intuitive judgement of a particular situation.

Confusion is endemic.  But, argues London Business School’s Costas Markides, it need not be.  “The confusion surrounding strategy manifests itself in a variety of ways.  But, in reality, the confusion is unfortunate – and unjustified.  Strategy is a very simple thing — at its simplest it is five or six creative ideas that tell us how our company is to fight the competitive battle in its industry.  It is not a plan; it is not a hundred-page report; it is not a budget; and it not a goal.  It is just five or six creative ideas.  If your company cannot put down its strategy on one sheet of paper then it does not have a strategy.”  The problem is that managers have been reared on an unhealthy diet of weighty reports, pithy distillation remains an elusive art.

Resources
Richard Rumelt, Good Strategy Bad Strategy, Profile 2012.

This was originally published in What we mean when we talk about strategy by Stuart Crainer and Des Dearlove (Infinite Ideas, 2016).

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I want to hear from you! http://thinkers50.com/blog/i-want-to-hear-from-you/ Tue, 20 Jun 2017 14:00:55 +0000 http://thinkers50.com/?p=10261 Feedback is very useful for telling us “where we are.” Learning how to solicit helpful feedback can help you in […]

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Feedback is very useful for telling us “where we are.” Learning how to solicit helpful feedback can help you in all aspects of your life!

Accompanying Written Blog Marshall’s Complete Video Blogs

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How Leaders Build Game-Changing Organizations http://thinkers50.com/blog/how-leaders-build-game-changing-organizations/ Mon, 19 Jun 2017 14:00:00 +0000 http://thinkers50.com/?p=10248 and iconic CEO and business leader Alan Mulally outline what it takes for leaders to build what they refer to […]

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and iconic CEO and business leader Alan Mulally outline what it takes for leaders to build what they refer to as Game-Changing Organizations- companies that are purpose-driven; performance-focused; and principles-led simultaneously.

As Alan Mulally, former CEO of Ford Motor Company and Boeing Commercial Airlines, put it:

“The 3 Ps are everything. Earlier in my career I thought performance was the only thing that mattered. But if you are leading a company that only cares about performance and some of your leaders ignore your core purpose or guiding principles, it’s only a matter of time before you will end up in trouble”.

In the article, Ready and Mulally argue that next-gen leaders must combine the skillsets of a business leader with the mindset of an enterprise leader to really guide companies through this era of extraordinary turbulence. As Ready put it: “Ironically, being a great business builder simply isn’t enough to lead in today’s world. Business acumen is now a matter of table stakes. When I talked with the leaders that companies have identified as next-gen role models, these were people who were equally adept at combining those skillsets with an enterprise-first mindset”.

Ready and Mulally offer an action plan for companies to cultivate their next generation of game-changing leaders. The article will appear in Sloan Management Review in the fall 2017 issue.

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Facing up to the new reality http://thinkers50.com/media/facing-new-reality/ Sun, 18 Jun 2017 18:37:26 +0000 http://thinkers50.com/?p=10253 Anti-globalization sentiments have started occupying center stage in the political narrative, of late—signaling a pronounced focus on localization and rejection […]

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Anti-globalization sentiments have started occupying center stage in the political narrative, of late—signaling a pronounced focus on localization and rejection of seamless trade flows. The Brexit vote and the Trump presidency seem to have added further punch to this counter trend, sparking concern the world over. But will isolationism ever work in an increasingly connected world?

Read the full article in The Smart Manager

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How To Network Like an Introvert http://thinkers50.com/blog/network-like-introvert/ Fri, 16 Jun 2017 14:00:56 +0000 http://thinkers50.com/?p=10160 Introverts can make great networkers—that’s what really came home to me last night. Rather than acting like my usual extroverted […]

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Introverts can make great networkers—that’s what really came home to me last night. Rather than acting like my usual extroverted self at a group gathering, I thought I should network half the time like an introvert, and it worked like a charm!

A friend of mine, Claude Mongeau, feels bound to behave as an extrovert because he is the CEO of CN, a railroad company with about 24,000 people. He enjoys quiet and solitude in his office, but when he leaves his floor, he puts on his “game face” and acts like an extrovert. In the same way, I am learning to act like an introvert from time to time in order to be a better leader. I’m not being inauthentic; instead, I’m being flexible and learning to listen.

I teach at McGill University, where I attended an alumni event last night. Over a hundred alumni of our business school gathered for drinks and canapés. I had taught about 20 percent of the alumni, so I felt I had to network like an extrovert. You know the type. Going from group to group, spending a few minutes with everyone, hugging people or kissing them (this is Montreal, after all!) and laughing with them.

This is my natural style, so I dove right in. And it can be effective: in our better moments, extroverts, like myself, charm people. Everyone likes us, but often, we are saying nothing of substance. We just don’t have time because we need to move on to make sure we talk to everyone in order to remain stimulated. Given the number of former students I had in the room, this was a good move. But being in the midst of a research project on quiet leaders and introverts in executive roles, I was wondering what it would be like to network like an introvert.

“Why not give it a try?” I asked myself.

For the first half of the evening, I did my traditional—more extroverted—form of networking. But for the second half, I put on my “game face” and acted like an introvert. In practical terms, I spent considerably longer than normal, 15-20 minutes, with three people. Two were former students who had just left a leading consulting firm and were working together to develop leadership programs—something I do as well. The other person with whom I connected was an operations person who also was striking out on his own doing consulting, and again, we found opportunities to collaborate.

In the past, I most likely would have spent a few minutes with them but then pushed on, thereby missing the opportunities that presented themselves only because I made the conscious decision to act like an introvert and spend more quality time with a few people. This was partly strategic: I chose the people based on whether I thought both parties would want to deepen the relationship, and it paid off.

Have you ever pushed yourself beyond your comfort zone to accomplish a goal?

An expert in CEO and C-Suite leadership, Karl is an Associate Professor at the Desautels Faculty of Management McGill University and an Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College. His current research looks at Introvert/Ambivert/Extrovert Leaders in the C-Suite. His other current research is on leading millennials; his book Leading, Managing, Working with Millennials will be out in 2017. He spent 11 years with IBM and Hitachi before doing his Ph.D. He works closely with his colleague Henry Mintzberg.

This article was originally published on QuietRev.

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Thinkers50 in 50 Seconds: Noah Askin http://thinkers50.com/blog/thinkers50-50-seconds-noah-askin/ Wed, 14 Jun 2017 14:00:48 +0000 http://thinkers50.com/?p=10211 An assistant professor of organizational behaviour at INSEAD, Noah Askin’s research interests include social and cultural networks, status, the production […]

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An assistant professor of organizational behaviour at INSEAD, Noah Askin’s research interests include social and cultural networks, status, the production and consumption of music, and higher education. Askin’s TED talk, “The recipe of a hit song” examined what makes a song reach the top 100 billboard chart. He is suitably chart-topping in this Thinkers50 Q&A.

What book are you currently reading?

“Creativity, Inc.” by Ed Catmull & “Every Song Ever: Twenty Ways to Listen in an Age of Musical Plenty” by Ben Ratliff.

How do you describe what you do?

I think about, study, and teach connectivity and its consequences. Whether between people, groups, organizations, or pretty much any other objects (like songs, for example), I’m interested in the dynamics of what happens between entities that are connected. And those connections don’t necessarily have to be direct or immediate, they can be perceived as well.

Who or what is your biggest inspiration?

Professionally, it’s my 9th & 10th grade English teacher, Mike Murray, who remains a close personal friend and mentor to this day. Personally, it’s my wife.

What does success look like?

The ability to spend your time doing what you want to do, rather than feeling like you have to do what others want you to do. All while loving and being loved.

What is your competitive advantage?

The people I am closest to and interact with on a regular basis.

How do you keep your thinking fresh?

Trying to maintain passions and interests outside of my main areas of research and teaching, and interacting with as many smart people as I can.

How much time do you spend travelling?

A lot. Upwards of 10 days/month. That’s starting to feel like too much.

What is the secret of a great presentation?

2 things:

An authentic voice. Be yourself and let your personality come through. Any attempt to match someone else’s style will typically be sniffed out by an audience, which doesn’t go well.

Passion for whatever it is your presenting. Even if you have to push yourself to find it, your enthusiasm for whatever you’re presenting will shine through and help raise the enthusiasm (and interest) levels of your audience.

What advice would you give to anyone who wants to follow in your footsteps?

Be open and try out a bunch of different stuff. Finding out what you don’t like is almost as important as figuring out what you do like, so don’t be afraid to move on if something doesn’t fit. Be ambitious without being overly committed to one path. Follow my father’s advice: “do what you can to put yourself in a position of opportunity and opportunity will present itself.”

What is your next goal?

Be as good a father as I can possibly be (we’re expecting our first child in August).

Describe yourself in three words.

Fortunate. Enthusiastic. Grateful.

For more information about Noah Askin please see noahaskin.com or follow him @naskin.

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Engaging the Audience Is Key http://thinkers50.com/blog/engaging-audience-key/ Tue, 13 Jun 2017 15:04:29 +0000 http://thinkers50.com/?p=10243 Today we have a new type of relationship – the virtual relationship. As a leader, here are three tips you […]

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Today we have a new type of relationship – the virtual relationship. As a leader, here are three tips you need to know when you engage on social media.

Accompanying Written Blog Marshall’s Complete Video Blogs

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