Thinkers50 Curated Linkedin Live with Ashley Dudarenok | New Retail

 

Ashley Dudarenok is a global keynote speaker and three-time Amazon best-selling author. She is based in Hong Kong and her books include “Unlocking the World’s Largest E-market”, “Digital China”, and “New Retail”. Ashley is a vlogger, podcaster, trainer, media contributor, and female leadership advocate. She is the founder of Chinese social media agency Alaris, the training company Shozan, and the creator of the Fire Personal Development course, which was designed with women in mind.

Transcript:

Des Dearlove:
Hello, welcome to Thinkers50 Radar 2021 series, brought to you with LinkedIn Live. I’m Des Dearlove.

Stuart Crainer:
And I’m Stuart Crainer. And we are the founders of Thinkers50, the world’s most reliable resource for identifying ranking and sharing the leading management ideas of our age, ideas that make a real difference in the world.

Des Dearlove:
A belief in the power of ideas has been the foundation of our work since we launched the first ever global Ranking of Management Thinkers in 2001, and we’ve published a new Thinkers50 ranking every two years since, and it remains unpleased to say the premier ranking of its kind.

Stuart Crainer:
So we are excited that 2021, a year in which fresh thinking and human ingenuity are more important than ever is also a Thinkers50 year.

Des Dearlove:
Nominations are now open for both, the Ranking of Management Thinkers and our Distinguished Achievement Awards, which the Financial Times calls the Oscars of management thinking.

Stuart Crainer:
In the summer, we will have the award shortlists to savor the years finale on 15th and 16th of November. We’ll bring all the excitement to the new Thinkers50 ranking and the naming of our Thinkers50 2021 award winners.

Des Dearlove:
But we start the year as ever with the Thinkers50 Radar class, the 30 up and coming business thinkers to watch in the coming months.

Stuart Crainer:
In this series of 30 minute webinars, we want to showcase some of those ideas to bring you the new voices of management thinking. We want to inspire you to seize this moment to create a better future for you and your organization.

Des Dearlove:
Our guest today is global keynote speaker, three-time Amazon best selling author, Ashley Dudarenok.

Stuart Crainer:
Ashley is based in Hong Kong and her books include Unlocking the World’s Largest E-market, Digital China and New Retail Born in China: Going Global. She is also a vlogger, podcaster, trainer, media contributor, and female leadership advocate. She’s the founder of Chinese social media agency, Alarice, the training company ChoZan and the creator of the Fire Personal Development Course, which was designed with women in mind.

Des Dearlove:
Ashley was a member of Alibaba’s Global Influencer Entourage and worked directly with a Tencent co-founder to conquer Western social media.

Stuart Crainer:
So we want to use the chat function to make the session as interactive as possible. So please share where you are joining us from today and post your questions as we go along.

Des Dearlove:
So Ashley, welcome. Let’s go back to the beginning. You were born in Vladivostok, how did you finish up being an expert on China and living in Hong Kong?

Ashley Dudareno:
Hi, Des. Hi, Stuart. Awesome to be here and indeed, I was born in Russian Far East. That is why I can truly say that I am the real Chinese. I mean, coming from that part of the country, which virtually borders on mainland China from my hometown, which is Vladivostok, it takes about 30 minutes to get to China mainland border. So we were surrounded with obviously Chinese influences, Japanese and even Korean influences growing up. And I moved to China when I was 15, actually 17 years old.
And before that, I also lived in New Zealand. I’ve been to England, I’ve been around the world studying, but China was a place that I chose to go to do my university degree. And back in the day, it was very unusual. Most of the people going to China went because they loved dragons and Kung Fu and noodles. And for me, the story was, well, you can guess money or love, which one was it? I was 17 years old and I traveled across the world.

Des Dearlove:
I’m guessing it was love.

Ashley Dudareno:
You got it, Des, it was love. So a boyfriend of mine at the time was studying Chinese as well, and we thought we could go there together. And that’s how my journey in mainland China began. I studied Chinese in the first year to be able to get into university. And then, since 18 I was studying in mainland Chinese university, business and economics. I did a higher mathematics and linear algebra in Chinese with Chinese students.

So basically, being in China early on in 2005, 6, 7, it was beautiful to see how this country is going through digitalization and how social media appeared and how suddenly people that did not have computers and desktops and laptops, were doing everything on mobile device. Being in a university, I purchased virtually all of my possessions on Taobao, online, which was ahead of it today, compared to what we had in the rest of the world.

And slowly and gradually, we built China through consistent effort of tech giants, and also amazing consumers that just jump on top of those trends. And also with some very clear government direction where the government wants you to go, in the short 15, 20 years, China was able to transform into what it is right now, which is the most exciting retail market in the world. And they are building the future of many technologies and especially the new retail.

And that’s how, after graduating from university, I decided to stay connected with the China market. I knew that my professional life was always dealing with mainland. And making a lifestyle choice, I decided to move to the beautiful hilly, gorgeous place, island of Hong Kong, and essentially, be here two weeks a month and be in the mainland two weeks a month. Until recently, a year ago, that was a very good plan. And right now it’s a bit more challenging with COVID, but essentially having teams in mainland China and Hong Kong works and working in this market is extremely exciting because it evolves so fast and truly it builds the future of the industry, I believe.

Des Dearlove:
Yes. I mean, let’s talk about new retail because I don’t think a lot of people in the West really understand how huge this phenomenon is and exactly what it involves. I mean, presumably it’s heading our way, but it’s very much something that’s emerged out of China. Can you just tell us a little bit and give us some Because the scale of it as well, give us some idea of Because I know you’ve just done a big report on this whole area.

Ashley Dudareno:
Absolutely. The new retail, a lot of people, when they think about new retail, they think omnichannel and that’s the biggest misconception there is because omnichannel has nothing to do with new retail. New retail, it actually has eight elements to it. And one of them is you produce content. The other element is you have e-commerce and you integrate it with online, so OMO, online-merge-offline.

The other element is you actually create products together with your customers based on the data. And you have manufacturing facilities that produce that product for brands and for, let’s say bloggers that want to sell something. Then you have the whole huge supply chain. Then you have your own logistics and that logistics doesn’t happen just a week later, it happens within 30 minutes. There are three stages of logistics. One that have happens within a few days, one that happens the next day, 24 hours or the one that happens, it’s called instant logistics, which happens within 30 minutes to two hours.

So there are eight elements and the most important centerpiece of all that new retail is data. So how do you capture data? How do you analyze it and how do you use it for all these different elements around it? So new retail is truly a new way to do business and being an ecosystem for brands to come in and use your data, use your manufacturing facilities, use your supply chain, logistics, your marketing, content creation, et cetera, services. So that is why all these trends that we hear coming from China, “Ooh, live streaming,” e-commerce is huge. Or, “Oh my God, this instant delivery,” or whatever else, it’s not independent, isolated incident. It is a part of ecosystem.

Des Dearlove:
Ecosystem.

Ashley Dudareno:
Absolutely. And in China, it’s not just one ecosystem or Alibaba has all these elements. There are others. There is Tencent plus JD, they complement each other because none separate one can actually operate without the other.

Then there is another one, ByteDance is building their own ecosystem. It’s just that Alibaba is the most complete ecosystem right now, but there are six players that are also trying to build their ecosystem, their payment services. That’s another element into the ecosystem.

Another one is entertainment. You need to have gains. You need to have opportunity to capture attention, to gamify the process. So all this is what puts this new retail into a different ballpark and the different scale. And we believe that what has been built in China is going to go global and ultimately the future.

Des Dearlove:
So you mentioned the potential to sort of co-create products. And can you give us a concrete example? Because a lot of our people listening wouldn’t necessarily know what that would look like. Is there an example of perhaps a product that grew out of that kind of co-creation process?

Ashley Dudareno:
Absolutely. One example could be, let’s talk about something that we all know and love, chocolate, right? So let’s talk about Snickers chocolate. So Mars, it was a couple of years ago when Alibaba actually just created this manufacturing kind of assistant, which uses data of your consumers and suggest you what you could do better. So they spoke with Mars and they said, “Hey guys, how about using chili peppers in your chocolate?” So at first they thought it was crazy, but then they tested it. It worked, people loved it. So then they launched it. And essentially that was awesome.

Another thing they knew, for example, there was another chocolate company that, I’m not sure whether it was Reach Sport or somebody else, but essentially they knew that their audience, younger Chinese, they love unicorns, but they didn’t know how to act on it, like how can you produce unicorn chocolate? And data out that you can, you just make it pink and you put rainbow inside and you call it limited decision unicorn chocolate. You can’t imagine. Within a couple of weeks, this whole batch was sold out. And then in China, there’s a very big, second-hand market where you can resell, let’s say Snickers, or you can resell chocolate that is limited edition, or even this little toys like this, right? So in China, these blind boxes are very big. So if it is a limited edition doll, I later on can sell something that costs $5 for $500 and there will be collectors and people that want to buy it.

So this limited edition unicorn chocolate became so popular that prices went absolutely mad on platforms like Taobao. And later on the company was forced to actually launch it in offline setting to incorporate it in their proper line. And there are many examples when For example, you are a blogger and a lot of people outside of China ask, “Oh my God, if you are a blogger, why these fees are so high?” Well, two reasons because Chinese blogs can actually sell. Number two, their opportunity cost is very high. Why would I promote on the behalf of this pen, if I can launch my own pen and make more money, right?

So that is why as blogger, you are co-creating together with this platforms based on the data, not just random data about some audience, but your audience, what are they interested in? Are they into unicorns? Are they into gaming? Do they like shape, color? What do they do right now? And then you come up with the whole collections that are instant, that you can launch right now, and that platform can help you deliver. So I, as a blogger have so many business opportunities and I don’t need to be Kim Kardashian or whoever else to actually be able to afford it and manufacture it and make money.

Stuart Crainer:
So thank you everyone for joining us. We’ve got people from Ghana, Denmark, India, Oman, Germany, Mongolia, Australia. Thank you everyone for joining us. Please send in your questions as a question from Bolor in Mongolia. She’s asking about holistic organizational digitalization, which I suppose gets to the point of digital is often seen as an initiative or a program rather than a complete approach to business. And it seems to me, that’s the big difference between China and the West. In the West, digitization is still seen as an initiative, an isolated endeavor rather than something holistic.

Ashley Dudareno:
Yeah. So in China, there’s no business, but digital business. It doesn’t matter whether you are selling soup noodles on the corner of that blog, next to the laundromat. You are in digital business. You are doing live streaming, you’re placing orders, you’re accepting digital payments. You have robots in your kitchens that are washing, that are serving, et cetera. And I honestly believe When I was little girl and I grew up, as I said, I was born in last years of Soviet Union, right? So when I first traveled to Japan and I saw an escalator, the stairs that are moving, I was so shocked beyond repair. When I saw of the sliding doors opening just automatic, I was so shocked. I’ve never seen a door like this. So right now you want to see the future, go to China. And you’re going to be shocked exactly the same way.

There are drones that are putting QR codes, just above the park. And you can scan that QR code and join the promotion, get a discount. There are holograms that are attracting people next to the restaurants to come in and try hot pots. There are 3D LED displays that are doing XYZ. And this is just the way of life. Even if you are in the countryside, selling oranges, you’re farming oranges, you have a lot of digital elements in your business. And every business essentially is digital, right? It’s not an initiative. It’s not something good to have. It’s not something that somebody’s trying to impose on the organization.

And that’s where the strength of China comes in. They don’t have legacy systems. They were basically in the stone age, in so many areas that they could jump and leap frog into the digital age right away. And what we need to do in the U.S., in Germany, in the UK and many more developed kind of economies, we need to first destroy how it used to work our legacy systems to then rebuild them. And that’s what we are struggling with because our mindset is we don’t want to let go of what was kind of working for many years.

Des Dearlove:
So we have another good question coming in because, yes, the explosion of activity and production and creativity, but where does sustainability fit into this? Because you’re talking about starting again in the west. I mean, one of the challenges presumably, is to make an economy more sustainable. Is that the case in China with the new retail? Or is it still kind of backward looking in the sense it doesn’t have the sustainability qualities that we would now want?

Ashley Dudareno:
I would say first of all, sustainability is definitely a national strategy, especially it’s been announced and endorsed for the past couple of years at the highest level. So if you would like to see what is China doing and where is China moving, it’s actually very easy and very straightforward. You don’t need a crystal ball. All you do is every year, there is an update meeting where they update what’s happening with their five-year plan.

So five-year plan has exactly, these are the five areas, AI development, or I do not know consumer drones, new retail, domestic tourists, et cetera, that we are focusing on. And you know, that they set targets, including, let’s say sustainability, including business development, including international involvement with some countries or regions and they are going to deliver on those goals. So in the past, as I said, a couple of years, specifically, we hear more and more about sustainability and there’s been a couple of great initiatives from garbage-sorting campaigns that first launched in a few cities and later on across the country.

And I mind you, I mean, China was like India, where there’s just no concept 10 years ago about sorting garbage or why it just all goes and burns in the landfill. And that was normal. Or it ends up in the ocean. That was just the way it is because nobody was educated. So China took an initiative, got it into a few cities, introduced it, created very digital ways to do it. For example, if I want to throw a bag of garbage and I live in a nicer neighborhood, I cannot just randomly throw it into the big bin downstairs. I need to scan a QR code that opens the bin. I put my garbage bag, it gives me a little QR code, I put it on my bag. I put the garbage bin inside. So if I did not sort it, if I put it in the wrong basket, they are going to find me. And if I did a good thing that a good citizen is supposed to do, I’m going to collect credits from the community.

So it can sound a bit extreme, but you need to act and be a part of your digital kind of ecosystem. So they did that and they rolled it out across the whole country. Right now, they’ve announced that by 2060, they’re going to be carbon neutral and yes, they’re going to hit the peak in [inaudible] or 2035. So it’s still definitely on the rise, but there is new alternative sources. They are the biggest market for EVs, electronic vehicles in the world. There are cities, for example, like Shenzhen, a 100% of their public traffic is basically electric vehicles. Nowhere in the world. It’s absolutely unparalleled.

So China is taking it seriously. It’s going to take them a couple of years to get there. It’s not coming from bottom-up. That’s also a big difference. In the West is coming bottom-up. People are saying, “Hey, we want better products. We want better packaging, et cetera.” In China, it comes from the directive and then companies act and companies and government together educate. And then the consumer becomes more receptive. So it’s good to have, it’s not a must. That’s where the difference is.

And when it comes to retail, I would also say that big tech giants, they need to, first of all, follow the government direction. The government says, we care about the environment. That’s what we do. So companies need to play in line with that announcement. And secondly, they also have their own corporate social responsibility. Alibaba is big on that. JD is big on that, Pinduoduo is starting to do things in that direction. So coming together, private sector, government sector, and the consumer, I believe that they’re going to deliver results for sure.

Stuart Crainer:
You’ve mentioned ecosystems a couple of times, Ashley, and we’ve done work around ecosystems. It is a new way of organizing, but it seems the Chinese are much more comfortable with the idea of there being a kind of dispersed ecosystem. It’s kind of vague relationships within that. Do you think that’s true?

Ashley Dudareno:
You mean one ecosystem connected to the other or within the-

Stuart Crainer:
Yeah, but just the entire idea of ecosystems, it seems the Chinese are more comfortable with it than the people in the West are.

Ashley Dudareno:
Oh, absolutely. Because in China, you know that first of all, if it’s an ecosystem, then I’m getting a lot of benefits by being a member of that ecosystem. In the West, when you become a customer of one company and then the company buys another company, it just feels that you have no way out and you are not really getting benefits. For example, Facebook purchased Instagram and right now out, if I want to advertise I mean, I only have one company that I can go to, it’s Facebook one way or the other. But in China, when I joined one ecosystem, I actually have more added value services. It’s more convenient for me. I can use my face to check out or to board the plane or to park my car. And it will recognize the person sitting in that car is me and my parking fee automatically be charged by WeChat for instance.

So there’s a lot of life services that are part of that. Making my life easier. I can register a baby. I can apply for divorce. I can purchase something, as I said, with my face, or I can do an investment, all being a part of that same ecosystem.
When it comes to the relationship between ecosystems, it’s much more complicated. Previously, there was this choose one policy where it wasn’t open, but basically, Tencent hated Alibaba, Alibaba hated Tencent. And then ByteDance at first was playing with the both. And then they said, “You know what? I want my own chair,” and then Meituan Dianping collaborating with Tencent. So all these complicated relationships, but right now government comes in and says, “Guys, you need to play nice and this is what you can or cannot do.” That’s why they start finding companies. That’s why they start making an example of them, not in order to kill them or prevent them from building stronger ecosystem.

But that’s how China works. In the West, we’re trying to regulate things before they take shape and form, like Bitcoin or cryptocurrency, we don’t know what it could be, but we are trying to come up with regulations on how it will impact business. But in China, they let you do it. Everything is allowed, unless it is specifically prohibited. So you go and do whatever you want. And then the moment comes and they say, “Oh, whoa. That is not allowed.” So yeah, that’s my take.

Des Dearlove:
Okay. I mean, well, alluded, you’ve directly been talking about obviously the different style of government and this huge collection of data that’s going on as part of this process. I mean, a lot of people in the Western area, I mean, obviously we have our system of democracy or our systems of democracy and people are nervous, concerned. How do people in China feel about of the data collection and potentially the control over their lives?

Ashley Dudareno:
Yeah. So I would say that there are some people that are more concerned than the others, and there are many reasons for that. Majority of people, generally in China are a lot less concerned than the average, let’s say, European or American, and the reasons are varied. First of all, education, they don’t quite understand how can it particularly manage your life or significantly impact your life long term. Another reason is that they’re really getting amazing convenience by trading their data. And in the West, we get nothing by spam. If I give my data, all I get is unwanted emails, messages, advertising, and I’m being chased online, offline, or in any other setting in order for somebody to sell me something. And that’s what China did well. They used this data to actually make your life more convenient to offer you all these We call them life services.

So you can go see the doctor virtually. You can scan something, get diagnosis. You can, as I said, board a plane with just your face so your identity is confirmed. So you enter airport and they show you where to go, in order you directly board the plane, you don’t need to go through five counters and have five boarding passes. You can basically do anything the government wants you to do also, online. You can invest, et cetera.

That is the convenience that I think made Chinese consumers very spoiled, very demanding, but there’s also no going back. And I think that the rest of the world also needs to understand one thing, right now with our data, with what AI is doing with technology with this digitalization or digitization, what we need to understand is that there’s no going back. It’s not that suddenly robots are going to disappear or AI is going to disappear, or bioengineering is going to disappear, or EVs are going to disappear. It’s not possible. It’s like electricity. It was invented and there are some countries that in 18th century, got on board and said, “Yeah, sure. Let’s put that grid and let’s do this.” And there were other countries that said, “Oh my God, I don’t know what this is about. I don’t want to do it.” So who won at the end? At the end, everybody has electricity because this is just human progress.

So the same thing with AI and use of data, there’s no way to stop it. Governments will use it. Companies will use it. Our life will be impacted. Some of our decision-making will change. But if we get on board with this message and we get on board on that train, we will be able to potentially steer that train of bus and potentially adjust those algorithms to have some decision-power. But right now it just feels that in the west very often, we choose not to get involved and not to try and try to overregulate it before we even understand what it could be. And I don’t have all answers, but I think it’s important to have that channel and that discussion open because both the East, as of China, and the West coming together, only together, we can actually envision it better, put our best thinking together and put it in practice.

China has a lot of data and great use cases across the country. The West has better algorithms and we have very different visions of life, very different visions of how this algorithms work. Only by bringing together, we can come up with something that will serve the whole humanity, I believe.

Stuart Crainer:
And has the pandemic accelerated this process? And make clear that [crosstalk]?

Ashley Dudareno:
Oh, absolutely. Before the pandemic, we used to say that China is developing, we say China speed. It means, it just goes very fast. But after the pandemic, we say it is China speed on steroids. So we’ve all heard the news that in Q1 this year, China has grew over 18%. It’s 18.3% GDP growth. Obviously, it is on the previous quarter, which was minus 6%, but nonetheless, it is an extraordinary result. And how could they achieve it? Yes, there is export, which is booming. There is domestic consumption, but at the same time, the tech giants, the digitalization of the country is reaching the scale where it’s very easy to put yourself out of certain crisis and focus on strategic areas. And in the rest of the world, we are really suffering with that.
So government companies, consumers, the whole sentiment, the whole positive sentiment of what the future is going to look like, in China, it has never changed. In the West, we just go like this, “Oh, we think the market is going to go very” In China, it’s rah-rah for the past 30 years. And this optimism is charging the whole environment. And digitalization is also showing that this is all possible.

And yeah, I totally see that so many things accelerated. For example, online education. I mean, right now we have smart AI that is checking students’ attention out. And I know a lot of people are very much against that. They say, “Okay, you cannot take attendance. You cannot observe children at school,” et cetera, because it might be used in some negative way, but at the same time, it’s data and data can be used in a positive or negative way. For example, what they are doing in a lot of government schools in China, they find the best teacher that can keep the attention of students and get the results. And then they are showing the little holograms or videos of that teacher into more rural schools. So they are really trying to find better way to educate.

Or for example, telemedicine, same thing or new retail. It’s just even more integrated into the fabric of that society. And virtually everybody’s doing live streaming. What is live streaming? Not just some crazy tech that is kind of back to the nineties, what we had in the U.S. with this TV advertising and selling us pens and jewelry online on the 24-hour channel. But it is a part of this new retail manifesting itself, even in the countryside, even with first-time merchants.

Des Dearlove:
Yeah. It’s interest thing. We had a conversation not so long ago with the former president of Estonia who was involved in the digitization of that country, because one of the first countries to be truly digital. Thomas Ilves and he’d been living in Silicon Valley and he was saying, he’s very, really frustrated because Silicon Valley was like going backwards in time. If he wanted to get a driving license or see a doctor, he still had to go through the old traditional ways and stand in line. And he was saying, “This is Silicon Valley. This should be the cradle of the digital world.” And he said, “If you don’t get on board with this even great powers like America and the European [inaudible] are just being left behind,” but China seems to be, I mean, the train seems to be accelerating. The worry is it’s disappearing up the tracks ahead of us and we won’t catch up. I mean, I know that some of this stuff is to do with the sort of the politics and the political system and people’s concerns. But as you said, it’s like the electrification point.

Ashley Dudareno:
Yeah. I believe it cannot be stopped. We need to get on board with it. And obviously, everybody can later on participate and regulate it as needed. But first, you need to get on board. And I think personally, again, if you are a tech innovation hub of the world where everybody wants to live and work, I think it’s kind of inexcusable if you are not really digital. And that is why before the pandemic hit Shenzhen, it was the place where actually a lot of Silicon Valley executives, top executives, I’m not talking about engineers, but top executive would spend weeks and sometimes months to just come and see how it’s done. Not only from manufacturing in perspective, but just see how the city is run, see how these companies are innovating and building and merging and growing together. And truly the most interesting point for them was how do they build those ecosystems?

And right now, for example, we even are working with a few companies in India, in Indonesia and in Russia. Tech companies that are within their own right, are building those ecosystems, following whose motto? Not Silicon Valley. They go to China and they want to learn from ByteDance. They want to learn from Tencent. They want to learn from Pinduoduo. They want to learn from Alibaba.

And they are trying to understand how these ecosystems were built. What are some important milestones and how can they use this knowledge to actually bring to their whole market and build an ecosystem. And sometimes, I mean, this Indian company is one of the biggest, they invested by Google, one of the biggest tech firms in the country, so they virtually want Chinese counterparts to sell them some of the, let me call them, plugins into the system that they can use in, for instance, to do live streaming right away. They say, “We are going to pay you license [inaudible]. We just want it fast because we know the West is not going to provide it to us. They are behind.”

Des Dearlove:
Actually, all of that is music to our ears. We become involved, we’ve started the thing at Thinkers50 called the business ecosystem alliance. And it’s all about showing that kind of knowledge. We will be talking to you again, because it sounds as though you have a lot to share in that area. And however we’ve run out of time, I’m afraid, on this particular webcast. So Stu, you have one more question.

Stuart Crainer:
I think the Consumer Trends Report, actually, 700 pages of essentially information about China. How people get hold of it?

Ashley Dudareno:
I will give a link to our website where you can download it. Actually, I wanted to show a couple of insights about Chinese consumers and the key trends. I wanted to talk about the night economy and about young consumers investing in finances and all these things. But unfortunately, we were involved in some other discussions. So do get in touch, sleep economy, lazy economy, Guochao, fitness economy, she economy, singles economy. All that stuff is in this 700 page report on chozan.co and I’m going to give link to Stuart and Des to share out with the community.

Stuart Crainer:
Brilliant. Ashley, thank you very much for your time and insights. We will invite you back so we can talk more about what about these issues. Thank you, everyone for joining us from throughout the world. It’s fantastic to see the range of people and where they come from. Next week, we have got Mitch Joel, we look forward to joining you then. Thank you very much, Ashley.

Des Dearlove:
Ashley, thank you.

Share this article:

Subscribe to our newsletter to keep up to date with the latest and greatest ideas in business, management, and thought leadership.

*mandatory field

Thinkers50 will use the information you provide on this form to be in touch with you and to provide news, updates, and marketing. Please confirm that you agree to have us contact you by clicking below:


You can change your mind at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link in the footer of any email you receive from us, or by contacting us at . We will treat your information with respect. For more information about our privacy practices please visit our website. By clicking below, you agree that we may process your information in accordance with these terms.

We use Mailchimp as our marketing platform. By clicking below to subscribe, you acknowledge that your information will be transferred to Mailchimp for processing. Learn more about Mailchimp's privacy practices here.